Big Ten Academic Alliance BigScience Newswire

BigScience logo

A convenient aggregation of breakthrough discoveries and research headlines from the Big Ten Academic Alliance member universities.

Subscribe to BigScience RSS feed Follow BigScience on Twitter Subscribe to BigScience email alerts

Sort Articles

[Page 1 of 139] Next Page

Method to predict surface ozone pollution levels provides 48-hour heads-up

February 16, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — A novel air quality model will help air quality forecasters predict surface ozone levels up to 48-hours in advance and with fewer resources, according to a team of meteorologists. Read more about: Method to predict surface ozone pollution levels provides 48-hour heads-up

Contact: Patricia L. Craig, 814-863-4663, plc103@psu.edu

Optogenetics used to kick start gene that plays role in neural defects

February 13, 2017 Purdue University

Purdue University and Indiana University School of Medicine scientists were able to force an epigenetic reaction that turns on and off a gene known to determine the fate of the neural stem cells, a finding that could lead to new therapeutics in the fight against select cancers and neural diseases. Read more about: Optogenetics used to kick start gene that plays role in neural defects

Contact: Brian Wallheimer, 765-532-0233, brian.wallheimer@gmail.com

FYI: Abbreviations exclude readers in scientific communication, experts say

February 13, 2017 Purdue University

The universal use of abbreviations in higher education is intended to simplify, but really they stifle scientific communication, according to Purdue University ostracism experts. Read more about: FYI: Abbreviations exclude readers in scientific communication, experts say

Contact: Amy Patterson Neubert, 765-494-9723, apatterson@purdue.edu

Super-resolution system reveals mechanics of tiny ‘DNA walker’

February 9, 2017 Purdue University

Researchers have introduced a new type of “super-resolution” microscopy and used it to discover the precise walking mechanism behind tiny structures made of DNA that could find biomedical and industrial applications. Read more about: Super-resolution system reveals mechanics of tiny ‘DNA walker’

Contact: Emil Venere, 765-494-4709, venere@purdue.edu

Deep groundwater aquifers respond rapidly to climate variability

February 8, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Changes in climate can rapidly impact even the deepest freshwater aquifers according to Penn State and Columbia University hydrologists. Read more about: Deep groundwater aquifers respond rapidly to climate variability

Contact: Patricia L. Craig, 814-863-4663, plc103@psu.edu

Broader updrafts in severe storms may increase chance of damaging hail

February 7, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Strong updrafts — currents of rising air — in severe thunderstorms are a prerequisite for hail formation. The width of these updrafts may be an indicator of an increased hail threat, according to Penn State meteorologists. Read more about: Broader updrafts in severe storms may increase chance of damaging hail

Contact: Patricia L. Craig, 814-863-4663, plc103@psu.edu

Medicaid waivers help parents of children with autism stay in the workforce

February 6, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

HERSHEY, Pa. — Medicaid waivers that improve access to home and community-based services for children with autism also help their parents keep their jobs, according to research from Penn State College of Medicine and collaborators. Read more about: Medicaid waivers help parents of children with autism stay in the workforce

Contact: Matthew Solovey, 717-531-8606, msolovey@hmc.psu.edu

Campus natural gas power plants pose no radon risks

February 6, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — When Penn State decided to convert its two power plants from their historic use of coal as a source of energy to natural gas, there was concern about radon emissions. Although radon is known to exist in natural gas, now Penn State research indicates that it does not escape from these two power plants in harmful amounts. Read more about: Campus natural gas power plants pose no radon risks

Contact: Patricia L. Craig, 814-863-4663, plc103@psu.edu

Change in astronaut’s gut bacteria attributed to spaceflight

February 3, 2017 Northwestern University

Northwestern University researchers studying the gut bacteria of Scott and Mark Kelly, astronauts and identical twin brothers, as part of NASA’s Twins Study have found that changes to certain gut “bugs” occur in space. The effect disappeared upon Scott Kelly’s return to Earth. The Northwestern team is one of 10 groups studying the Kelly twins to learn how living in space for a long period of time affects the human body. The findings could lead to a better understanding of human health and disease. Read more about: Change in astronaut’s gut bacteria attributed to spaceflight

Contact: Megan Fellman, 847-491-3115, fellman@northwestern.edu

Conflict and conformity, culture and technology ruled in rock's early days

February 2, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame might look a lot different if rock music historians, rather than rock music critics, selected inductees to the hall, according to a Penn State cultural historian. There could even be a spot for Pat Boone's bust in that rock history hall of fame. Read more about: Conflict and conformity, culture and technology ruled in rock's early days

Contact: Matt Swayne, 814-865-9481, mls29@psu.edu

Monster Martian volcano unlike anything on Earth, scientists say

February 2, 2017 Purdue University

n unusual meteorite found in Algeria in 2012 has given scientists information about volcanic activity on Mars, and it's not like anything we've ever seen on Earth. Read more about: Monster Martian volcano unlike anything on Earth, scientists say

Contact: Steve Tally, 765-494-9809, steve@purdue.edu

Infrared links could simplify data center communications

January 31, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

SAN FRANCISCO — Data centers are the central point of many, if not most, information systems today, but the masses of wires interconnecting the servers and piled high on racks begins to resemble last year's tangled Christmas-tree lights disaster. Now a team of engineers is proposing to eliminate most of the wires and substitute infrared free-space optics for communications. Read more about: Infrared links could simplify data center communications

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer, 814-865-9481, aem1@psu.edu

Shootings in U.S. schools are linked to increased unemployment

January 30, 2017 Northwestern University

A Northwestern University study has found that economic insecurity is related to the rate of gun violence at K-12 and postsecondary schools in the United States. When it becomes more difficult for people coming out of school to find jobs, the rate of gun violence at schools increases. The study reveals a persistent connection over time between unemployment and the occurrence of school shootings in the country as a whole, across various regions of the country and within affected cities. Read more about: Shootings in U.S. schools are linked to increased unemployment

Contact: Megan Fellman, 847-491-3115, fellman@northwestern.edu

IU study finds fly growth mimics cancer cells, creating new tool in fight against disease

January 24, 2017 Indiana University

Scientists who study a molecule known to play a role in certain types of cancers and neurodegenerative disorders have a powerful new tool to study this compound due to research conducted at Indiana University. The study was published Jan. 23 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Read more about: IU study finds fly growth mimics cancer cells, creating new tool in fight against disease

Contact: Kevin D. Fryling, 812-856-2988, kfryling@iu.edu

Scientists get best view yet of cancer-causing virus HPV

January 24, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

HERSHEY, Pa. — New details of the structure of the human papillomavirus (HPV) may lead to better vaccines and HPV anti-viral medications, according to studies led by a Penn State College of Medicine researcher. Read more about: Scientists get best view yet of cancer-causing virus HPV

Contact: Matthew Solovey, 717-531-8606, msolovey@hmc.psu.edu

Jet lag impairs performance of major league baseball players

January 23, 2017 Northwestern University

A Northwestern University study of how jet lag affects Major League Baseball players traveling across just a few time zones found that when players travel in a way that misaligns their internal 24-hour clock with the natural environment and its cycle of sunlight, they suffer negative consequences. The researchers found that jet lag negatively affects the base running of home teams but not away teams and that home and away pitchers both give up more home runs when jet-lagged. Read more about: Jet lag impairs performance of major league baseball players

Contact: Megan Fellman, 847-491-3115, fellman@northwestern.edu

Brain stimulation used like a scalpel to improve memory

January 19, 2017 Northwestern University

Scientists showed for the first time that non-invasive brain stimulation can be used like a scalpel to affect a specific improvement in precise memory. Precise memory, rather than general memory, is critical for knowing the building you are looking for has a specific color, shape and location, rather than simply knowing the part of town it’s in. Precise memory is crucial for normal functioning, and it is often lost in people with memory disorders. Read more about: Brain stimulation used like a scalpel to improve memory

Contact: Marla Paul, 312-503-8928, marla-paul@northwestern.edu

Support for Chicago Biomedical Consortium renewed

January 18, 2017 Northwestern University

The Searle Funds at The Chicago Community Trust has renewed its funding commitment to the Chicago Biomedical Consortium, a research and education collaboration of Northwestern University, the University of Illinois at Chicago and University of Chicago that has helped establish the Chicago area as a biomedical sciences leader. The Searle Funds has pledged $21 million over five years. This support will stimulate collaborations for improving human health and launch a focus on fostering a culture of entrepreneurship among university researchers. Read more about: Support for Chicago Biomedical Consortium renewed

Contact: Megan Fellman, 847-491-3115, fellman@northwestern.edu

A tale of two pulsars' tails: Plumes offer geometry lessons to astronomers

January 17, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Like cosmic lighthouses sweeping the universe with bursts of energy, pulsars have fascinated and baffled astronomers since they were first discovered 50 years ago. In two studies, international teams of astronomers suggest that recent images from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory of two pulsars — Geminga and B0355+54 — may help shine a light on the distinctive emission signatures of pulsars, as well as their often perplexing geometry. Read more about: A tale of two pulsars' tails: Plumes offer geometry lessons to astronomers

Contact: Matt Swayne, 814-865-9481, mls29@psu.edu

Researchers ID target of immune system's assault on heart

January 16, 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

With the publication of a recent study, Jay Reddy continues to unravel the mysteries of the heart while driven by the memories of those dearest to his own. Read more about: Researchers ID target of immune system's assault on heart

Contact: Jay Reddy, 402-472-8541, jayreddy@unl.edu

Conservation practices may leave African indigenous populations behind

January 12, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Conservation and logging groups in Central and West Africa are failing to fully incorporate local concerns into management, marginalizing the livelihoods of the local population, according to Nathan Clay, Ph.D. candidate in geography, Penn State. Read more about: Conservation practices may leave African indigenous populations behind

Contact: Patricia L. Craig, 814-863-4663, plc103@psu.edu

Annual report examines state of college student mental heath

January 12, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Despite increased demand for counseling centers on college campuses, students aren’t necessarily getting sicker. Instead, it’s likely student mental health needs across the country have increased due to national prevention and awareness efforts over the past decade. Read more about: Annual report examines state of college student mental heath

Contact: Heather Robbins, 814-865-7517, hmh5009@psu.edu

Researchers use stem cells to regenerate the external layer of a human heart

January 11, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — A process using human stem cells can generate the cells that cover the external surface of a human heart — epicardium cells — according to a multidisciplinary team of researchers. Read more about: Researchers use stem cells to regenerate the external layer of a human heart

Contact: Stefanie Tomlinson, 814-865-5544, stomlinson@engr.psu.edu

Cheery robots may make creepy companions, but could be intelligent assistants

January 11, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Cheery robots may give people the creeps and serious robots may actually ease anxiety depending on how users perceive the robot's role in their lives, according to an international team of researchers. Read more about: Cheery robots may make creepy companions, but could be intelligent assistants

Contact: Matt Swayne, 814-865-9481, mls29@psu.edu

Powers of perception may explain evolutionary riddle

January 10, 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

A strikingly literal case of perception shaping reality could explain a paradox involving nectar-producing flowers and the bats that pollinate them, says new research from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and several European institutions. Read more about: Powers of perception may explain evolutionary riddle

Contact: Alan Kamil, 402-525-0426, alanckamil99@gmail.com

[Page 1 of 139] Next Page