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Antidepressant use in early pregnancy does not increase risk of autism, ADHD in kids, IU study finds

April 18, 2017 Indiana University

A study reported April 18 in the Journal of the American Medical Association led by Indiana University suggests that mothers' use of antidepressants during early pregnancy does not increase the risk of their children developing autism or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, conditions previously associated with these medications. Read more about: Antidepressant use in early pregnancy does not increase risk of autism, ADHD in kids, IU study finds

Contact: Kevin D. Fryling, 812-856-2988, kfryling@iu.edu

Soft robotic could ease complications, cost of colonoscopy

April 18, 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Hossein Dehghani envisions a future in which a self-driving robot can explore your colon – allowing a human to spend less time navigating the five-foot tunnel and more time performing a potentially life-saving inspection. Read more about: Soft robotic could ease complications, cost of colonoscopy

Contact: Hossein Dehghani, 402-472-4206, h.dehqani@huskers.unl.edu

Nontoxic, biodegradable orthopedic implant could provide superior support to damaged bones, be safely absorbed by the body

April 13, 2017 Purdue University

Purdue researchers are developing a nontoxic, biodegradable orthopedic implant that could be safely absorbed by the body after providing adequate support to damaged bones. Read more about: Nontoxic, biodegradable orthopedic implant could provide superior support to damaged bones, be safely absorbed by the body

Contact: Emil Venere, 765-494-4709, venere@purdue.edu

Graphene ‘phototransistor’ promising for optical technologies

April 12, 2017 Purdue University

Researchers have solved a problem hindering development of highly sensitive optical devices made of a material called graphene, an advance that could bring applications from imaging and displays to sensors and high-speed communications. Read more about: Graphene ‘phototransistor’ promising for optical technologies

Contact: Emil Venere, 765-494-4709, venere@purdue.edu

Method improves semiconductor fiber optics, paves way for developing devices

April 11, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — A new method to improve semiconductor fiber optics may lead to a material structure that might one day revolutionize the global transmission of data, according to an interdisciplinary team of researchers. Read more about: Method improves semiconductor fiber optics, paves way for developing devices

Contact: Patricia L. Craig, 814-863-4663, plc103@psu.edu

Particle offers promise for vaccine in pill form

April 11, 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

A microscopic corn-and-shrimp cocktail could eventually make DNA-based vaccinations and cancer-treating gene therapies an easier pill to swallow, according to new research from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Read more about: Particle offers promise for vaccine in pill form

Contact: Angela Pannier, 402-472-0896, apannier2@unl.edu

Fast capture of cancer markers will aid in diagnosis and treatment

April 10, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — A nanoscale product of human cells that was once considered junk is now known to play an important role in intercellular communication and in many disease processes, including cancer metastasis. Researchers at Penn State have developed nanoprobes to rapidly isolate these rare markers, called extracellular vesicles (EVs), for potential development of precision cancer diagnoses and personalized anticancer treatments. Read more about: Fast capture of cancer markers will aid in diagnosis and treatment

Contact: Walt Mills, 814-865-0285, wem12@psu.edu

Food webs entangle humans, animals, crops and the environment

April 10, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Reconstructed food webs from the Ancestral Puebloan southwestern United States show the complexity and interconnectedness of humans, other animals, crops and the environment, in an area of uncertain climate and resources, according to researchers, who think climate change and human decisions then, may shed light on future human choices. Read more about: Food webs entangle humans, animals, crops and the environment

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer, 814-865-9481, aem1@psu.edu

Crystalline material could replace silicon to double efficiency of solar cells

April 6, 2017 Purdue University

A new material has been shown to have the capability to double the efficiency of solar cells by researchers at Purdue University and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Read more about: Crystalline material could replace silicon to double efficiency of solar cells

Contact: Steve Tally, 765-494-9809, steve@purdue.edu

Low-cost ‘solar absorber’ promising for future power plants

April 5, 2017 Purdue University

Researchers have shown how to modify commercially available silicon wafers into a structure that efficiently absorbs solar energy and withstands the high temperatures needed for “concentrated solar power” plants that might run up to 24 hours a day. Read more about: Low-cost ‘solar absorber’ promising for future power plants

Contact: Emil Venere, 765-494-4709, venere@purdue.edu

Low-cost ‘solar absorber’ promising for future power plants

April 5, 2017 Purdue University

Researchers have shown how to modify commercially available silicon wafers into a structure that efficiently absorbs solar energy and withstands the high temperatures needed for “concentrated solar power” plants that might run up to 24 hours a day. Read more about: Low-cost ‘solar absorber’ promising for future power plants

Contact: Emil Venere, 765-494-4709, venere@purdue.edu

Individuals who solely murder children differ from other murderers

April 4, 2017 Northwestern University

The neuropsychological profiles of murderers who solely kill children differ significantly from the profiles of those who kill children and adults in the same homicidal act, according to a new study. Murderers of children are impulsive, have lower intelligence and often mental illness. Identifying the differences in the two types of killers adds to the very limited research on the topic and could help predict which children may be at risk.  Read more about: Individuals who solely murder children differ from other murderers

Contact: Marla Paul, 312-503-8928, marla-paul@northwestern.edu

Controlling forces between atoms, molecules, promising for ‘2-D hyperbolic’ materials

April 4, 2017 Purdue University

A new approach to control forces and interactions between atoms and molecules, such as those employed by geckos to climb vertical surfaces, could bring advances in new materials for developing quantum light sources. Read more about: Controlling forces between atoms, molecules, promising for ‘2-D hyperbolic’ materials

Contact: Emil Venere, 765-494-4709, venere@purdue.edu

Tests can help quantify automatic empathy and moral intuitions

March 30, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — When people scan the latest political headlines or watch a video from a war-ravaged land, they tend to feel snap ethical or moral responses first and reason through them later. Now a team of psychologists have developed news tests and mathematical models that help to capture and quantify those snap moral and empathetic judgments. Read more about: Tests can help quantify automatic empathy and moral intuitions

Contact: Matt Swayne, 814-865-9481, mls29@psu.edu

New approach improves potential HIV vaccine

March 29, 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

By engineering an on/off switch into a weakened form of HIV, University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers have enhanced the safety and effectiveness of a potential vaccine for the virus that has killed approximately 35 million people during the past 35 years. Read more about: New approach improves potential HIV vaccine

Contact: Qingsheng Li, 402-472-5922, qli@unl.edu

Adding grads and going green can brighten economic outlook

March 29, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- Attracting college graduates and boosting natural amenities may give communities a double shot of economic growth potential, according to economists. Read more about: Adding grads and going green can brighten economic outlook

Contact: Matt Swayne, 814-865-9481, mls29@psu.edu

Eating peanuts may lead to supple arteries and healthy hearts

March 29, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Eating peanuts with a meal may help protect against cardiovascular diseases which can lead to heart attacks and stroke, according to an international team of researchers. Read more about: Eating peanuts may lead to supple arteries and healthy hearts

Contact: Matt Swayne, 814-865-9481, mls29@psu.edu

Female menstrual cycle in a dish

March 28, 2017 Northwestern University

What if women could have a miniature, personalized reproductive system made with their own tissues that could predict how they would respond to certain medications? Northwestern has developed the first phase of this technology, made with human tissue, which could eventually change the future of research and treatment of diseases in women’s reproductive organs. It will allow physicians to test drugs for safety and effectiveness and better understand such diseases as endometriosis, fibroids, cancer and infertility. Read more about: Female menstrual cycle in a dish

Contact: Marla Paul , 312-503-8928, marla-paul@northwestern.edu

Indiana University-led team maps Zika virus protein to speed search for cure

March 27, 2017 Indiana University

A new study shows how Indiana University scientists are speeding the path to new treatments for the Zika virus, an infectious disease linked to birth defects in infants in South and Central America and the United States. Read more about: Indiana University-led team maps Zika virus protein to speed search for cure

Contact: Kevin D. Fryling, 812-856-2988, kfryling@iu.edu

Biopesticide could defeat insecticide resistance in bed bugs

March 23, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — A fungal biopesticide that shows promise for the control of bed bugs is highly effective even against bedbug populations that are insecticide resistant, according to research conducted by scientists at Penn State and North Carolina State universities. Read more about: Biopesticide could defeat insecticide resistance in bed bugs

Contact: Chuck Gill, 814-863-2713, cdg5@psu.edu

Big-game jitters: Coyotes no match for wolves' hunting prowess

March 22, 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

John Benson and colleagues provide evidence that while the eastern coyote has taken the eastern wolf's place at the top of some North American food chains, it hunts moose and other large prey far less frequently -- leaving an ecological niche vacant. Read more about: Big-game jitters: Coyotes no match for wolves' hunting prowess

Contact: John Benson, 402-472-3471, jbenson22@unl.edu

Nebraska part of national research initiative to improve cover crops

March 22, 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln is part of a $6.6 million research initiative to promote soil health through the development and adoption of new cover crops across the United States. Read more about: Nebraska part of national research initiative to improve cover crops

Contact: John Guretzky, 402-472-1516, jguretzky2@unl.edu

Frequent dining out may lead to food budget-busting behaviors

March 21, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — People who frequently dine out —including workers who often eat out for lunch — may struggle to maintain control of their food budget, according to a Penn State researcher. Read more about: Frequent dining out may lead to food budget-busting behaviors

Contact: Matt Swayne, 814-865-9481, mls29@psu.edu

Study examines how, why adolescence halts girls' interest in science

March 21, 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Past research has shown that enthusiasm for science is the same for girls and boys until a drop among females between fourth and eighth grades. Sociologists at Nebraska took a closer look at why this happens. Read more about: Study examines how, why adolescence halts girls' interest in science

Contact: Robin Gauthier, 402-318-7145, ggauthier3@unl.edu

Does Mars have rings? Not right now, but maybe one day

March 20, 2017 Purdue University

As children, we learned about our solar system’s planets by certain characteristics — Jupiter is the largest, Saturn has rings, Mercury is closest to the sun. Mars is red, but it’s possible that one of our closest neighbors also had rings at one point and may have them again someday. That’s the theory put forth by Purdue scientists, whose findings were published in the journal Nature Geoscience. Read more about: Does Mars have rings? Not right now, but maybe one day

Contact: Brian Wallheimer, 765-532-0233, brian.wallheimer@gmail.com

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