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Biopesticide could defeat insecticide resistance in bed bugs

March 23, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — A fungal biopesticide that shows promise for the control of bed bugs is highly effective even against bedbug populations that are insecticide resistant, according to research conducted by scientists at Penn State and North Carolina State universities. Read more about: Biopesticide could defeat insecticide resistance in bed bugs

Contact: Chuck Gill, 814-863-2713, cdg5@psu.edu

Big-game jitters: Coyotes no match for wolves' hunting prowess

March 22, 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

John Benson and colleagues provide evidence that while the eastern coyote has taken the eastern wolf's place at the top of some North American food chains, it hunts moose and other large prey far less frequently -- leaving an ecological niche vacant. Read more about: Big-game jitters: Coyotes no match for wolves' hunting prowess

Contact: John Benson, 402-472-3471, jbenson22@unl.edu

Nebraska part of national research initiative to improve cover crops

March 22, 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln is part of a $6.6 million research initiative to promote soil health through the development and adoption of new cover crops across the United States. Read more about: Nebraska part of national research initiative to improve cover crops

Contact: John Guretzky, 402-472-1516, jguretzky2@unl.edu

Frequent dining out may lead to food budget-busting behaviors

March 21, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — People who frequently dine out —including workers who often eat out for lunch — may struggle to maintain control of their food budget, according to a Penn State researcher. Read more about: Frequent dining out may lead to food budget-busting behaviors

Contact: Matt Swayne, 814-865-9481, mls29@psu.edu

Study examines how, why adolescence halts girls' interest in science

March 21, 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Past research has shown that enthusiasm for science is the same for girls and boys until a drop among females between fourth and eighth grades. Sociologists at Nebraska took a closer look at why this happens. Read more about: Study examines how, why adolescence halts girls' interest in science

Contact: Robin Gauthier, 402-318-7145, ggauthier3@unl.edu

Does Mars have rings? Not right now, but maybe one day

March 20, 2017 Purdue University

As children, we learned about our solar system’s planets by certain characteristics — Jupiter is the largest, Saturn has rings, Mercury is closest to the sun. Mars is red, but it’s possible that one of our closest neighbors also had rings at one point and may have them again someday. That’s the theory put forth by Purdue scientists, whose findings were published in the journal Nature Geoscience. Read more about: Does Mars have rings? Not right now, but maybe one day

Contact: Brian Wallheimer, 765-532-0233, brian.wallheimer@gmail.com

Chicago’s red-light camera program has significant safety benefits

March 20, 2017 Northwestern University

Chicago’s red-light cameras reduce serious injury crashes at intersections where they are placed and also have a measurable “spillover effect” that improves safety at intersections without cameras, according to a new Northwestern University Transportation Center study. The report provides tools and analysis that can help the city identify existing and potential camera locations requiring further attention and notes that enforcing red-light camera violations occurring within fractions of a second after the light turns red might not provide significant safety benefits. Read more about: Chicago’s red-light camera program has significant safety benefits

Contact: Megan Fellman, 847-491-3115, fellman@northwestern.edu

Human antibody for Zika virus promising for treatment, prevention

March 16, 2017 Purdue University

Researchers have determined the structure of a human antibody bound to the Zika virus, revealing details about how the antibody interferes with the infection mechanism – findings that could aid in development of antiviral medications. Read more about: Human antibody for Zika virus promising for treatment, prevention

Contact: Emil Venere, 765-494-4709, venere@purdue.edu

Research suggests diagnostic approach for veterans suffering hearing impairment and related brain injury from mild blast trauma

March 16, 2017 Purdue University

New research findings suggest mild blast trauma suffered by military personnel affects portions of the auditory system that have not been extensively studied after injuries occur, and this impairment might be diagnosed using well-established testing methods. Read more about: Research suggests diagnostic approach for veterans suffering hearing impairment and related brain injury from mild blast trauma

Contact: Emil Venere, 765-494-4709, venere@purdue.edu

Nebraska tool boosts gene analysis

March 16, 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Dubbed MicroRNA Discovery, the web-based platform gives researchers worldwide access to a computing cluster that efficiently analyzes the vast numbers of nucleotide sequences found in a sample of blood or urine. Read more about: Nebraska tool boosts gene analysis

Contact: Juan Cui, 402-472-5023, jcui@cse.unl.edu

Nose form was shaped by climate

March 15, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Big, small, broad, narrow, long or short, turned up, pug, hooked, bulbous or prominent, humans inherit their nose shape from their parents, but ultimately, the shape of someone's nose and that of their parents was formed by a long process of adaptation to our local climate, according to an international team of researchers. Read more about: Nose form was shaped by climate

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer, 814-865-9481, aem1@psu.edu

Drug combination delivered by nanoparticles may help in melanoma treatment

March 15, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

HERSHEY, Pa. — The first of a new class of medication that delivers a combination of drugs by nanoparticle may keep melanoma from becoming resistant to treatment, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. Read more about: Drug combination delivered by nanoparticles may help in melanoma treatment

Contact: Matthew Solovey, 717-531-8606, msolovey@hmc.psu.edu

CAREER award boosts Yu's network visualization research

March 15, 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Hongfeng Yu, assistant professor of computer science and engineering, is developing new techniques to greatly expand network visualization capabilities that ultimately could help crack complex scientific puzzles. Read more about: CAREER award boosts Yu's network visualization research

Contact: Hongfeng Yu, 402-472-5013, yu@cse.unl.edu

Nebraska sociologists probe gaps in rural drug programs

March 14, 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The study from Nebraska sociologists – one of the first to look at rural and urban access and usage of syringe exchange programs – noted that such prevention programs are not always readily available in rural areas. Read more about: Nebraska sociologists probe gaps in rural drug programs

Contact: Melissa Welch-Lazoritz, 712-490-7910, mwelch2@unl.edu

Energy crop production on conservation lands may not boost greenhouse gases

March 10, 2017 Pennsylvania State University

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Growing sustainable energy crops without increasing greenhouse gas emissions, may be possible on seasonally wet, environmentally sensitive landscapes, according to researchers who conducted a study on Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) land. Read more about: Energy crop production on conservation lands may not boost greenhouse gases

Contact: Jeff Mulhollem, 814-863-2719, jjm29@psu.edu

Study reveals a 'Wild West' with rules of the biking road

March 10, 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

New research co-authored by a transportation expert at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln suggests that bicyclists' behavior, like that of motorists, often is governed by unspoken rules of the road. Read more about: Study reveals a 'Wild West' with rules of the biking road

Contact: Daniel Piatkowski, 402-472-9239, dpiatkowski2@unl.edu

Hair loss and prostate drugs linked to persistent erectile dysfunction in men

March 9, 2017 Northwestern University

Men with longer exposure to the drugs finasteride and dutasteride had a higher risk of getting persistent erectile dysfunction than men with less exposure, reports a new study. The persistent erectile dysfunction continued despite stopping these drugs, in some cases for months or years. Prior to the study, there was no strong evidence the drugs cause sexual problems that continue after men stop taking them or that taking these drugs for a longer time increases the chance of experiencing sexual problems. Read more about: Hair loss and prostate drugs linked to persistent erectile dysfunction in men

Contact: Marla Paul, 312-503-8928, marla-paul@northwestern.edu

New ‘biomimetic’ glue shows high-strength bonding under water

March 9, 2017 Purdue University

An adhesive that works under water and is modeled after those created by shellfish to stick to surfaces is stronger than many commercial glues created for the purpose. “Our current adhesives are terrible at wet bonding, yet marine biology solved this problem eons ago,” said Jonathan Wilker, a professor of chemistry and materials engineering at Purdue University. Read more about: New ‘biomimetic’ glue shows high-strength bonding under water

Contact: Emil Venere, 765-494-4709, venere@purdue.edu

IU study finds caffeine boosts enzyme that could protect against dementia

March 7, 2017 Indiana University

A study by Indiana University researchers has identified 24 compounds -- including caffeine -- with the potential to boost an enzyme in the brain shown to protect against dementia. The research appeared March 7 in the journal Scientific Reports. Read more about: IU study finds caffeine boosts enzyme that could protect against dementia

Contact: Kevin D. Fryling, 812-856-2988, kfryling@iu.edu

Northwestern to focus on critical theory in the Global South

March 7, 2017 Northwestern University

Northwestern University is leading a new curriculum initiative that will bring together researchers from across the globe and a wide range of disciplines to focus on critical theory in the Global South. Led by the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences, the initiative is designed to deepen and broaden the understanding of an area of scholarship that increasingly challenges core assumptions about research in the humanities and social sciences and the methodologies employed for analysis. The initiative was launched with $1 million grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Read more about: Northwestern to focus on critical theory in the Global South

Contact: Pat Vaughan Tremmel, 847-491-4892, p-tremmel@northwestern.edu

Breakthrough discovery may make blood test feasible for detecting cancer

March 7, 2017 Purdue University

Doctors may soon be able to detect and monitor a patient’s cancer with a simple blood test, reducing or eliminating the need for more invasive procedures, according to Purdue research. Read more about: Breakthrough discovery may make blood test feasible for detecting cancer

Contact: Shari Finnell, 317-201-2345, sfinnell@purdue.edu

Cells communicate better when not squeezed together, research shows

March 7, 2017 Purdue University

Scientists are beginning to realize that many cellular behaviors, such as metastasizing cancer cells moving through the body or wound healing, aren't random events, but the result of coordinated actions by cells. Such collective cell movement requires communication, and a new study shows that cells are most effective at communication when they aren't tightly packed together. Read more about: Cells communicate better when not squeezed together, research shows

Contact: Steve Tally, 765-494-9809, steve@purdue.edu

Rising CO2 due to climate change may not improve agriculture, model shows

March 7, 2017 Purdue University

Although many people have argued that rising carbon dioxide levels would benefit crop production, a recent model of the effects of increased CO2 shows that it's not that simple and that elevated levels could have a much less positive effect on plant photosynthesis than previously predicted. Read more about: Rising CO2 due to climate change may not improve agriculture, model shows

Contact: Steve Tally, 765-494-9809, steve@purdue.edu

IU chemists create molecular 'leaf' that collects and stores solar power without solar panels

March 7, 2017 Indiana University

An research team at Indiana University has engineered a molecule that uses light or electricity to convert the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide -- a carbon-neutral fuel source -- more efficiently than any other method of "carbon reduction." The discovery, reported today in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, is a new milestone in the quest to recycle carbon dioxide in the Earth’s atmosphere into carbon-neutral fuels and others materials. Read more about: IU chemists create molecular 'leaf' that collects and stores solar power without solar panels

Contact: Kevin Fryling, 812-856-2988, kfryling@iu.edu

Prototype may lower barriers to growing new cells

March 3, 2017 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Yuguo "Leo" Lei has engineered a prototype system that could reduce the cost and complexity of growing patient-derived cells, advancing the cause of personalized therapies that replace damaged or dead cells to regenerate tissues in the body. Read more about: Prototype may lower barriers to growing new cells

Contact: Yuguo "Leo" Lei, 402-472-2750, ylei14@unl.edu

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